23.7.13

Youth IV Lane - Anti-aging treatments



While IV vitamin therapy isn't new — 50 years ago, Baltimore doc John Myers treated fatigue and depression with his injectable "Myers' Cocktail" of, among other things, B6, B12, and magnesium — the practice is enjoying a resurgence of late, thanks to customized, tailor-made-for-you IV drips designed to treat whatever ails you - Can't sleep? Flood your veins with vitamin D! Suffer from digestive problems? Mainline folic acid! Problem is, there's scant medical evidence to prove it works, still some doctors have for years been prescribing mega-doses of vitamin C to alleviate symptoms of multiple sclerosis, Lyme disease, even cancer.

The procedure is currently being reported as the secret antiaging weapon of reed-thin models and celebs. Apparently, IV drips are so ubiquitous in L.A., you can order one with your facial. When stars need to shine at a party (or recover from one), they visit their dermatologist for a Vita-Infusion Facial coupled with Anti-aging IV treatments.

While an aesthetician tends to the skin, a registered nurse or a doctor starts an IV filled with vitamins C and B, calcium gluconate, and magnesium chloride—a modified version of a vitamin mixture that has been studied for its effect on chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia. Patients get an energy boost and "a nice glow, probably related to vasodilation," as explained by Dr. Norman Leaf MD, who owns the practice and is an associate clinical professor of plastic surgery at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.

Los Angeles and Jackson Hole, Wyoming, aesthetician Melanie Simon, whose fans reportedly include Oprah Winfrey and Vanessa Williams, says she has seen skin glow for 24 hours when amino acids are added to a basic vitamin drip. She does not do the drip herself, but refers clients to a doctor specializing in anti-aging medicine. The aminos act as a vasodilator, increasing blood flow to the skin."

Warning Disclaimer:  Any IV treatments should only be given in reputable medical facilities, where "the risk of intravenous infection is impossibly low in the hands of skilled practitioners, and the dosage is safe.